The CRKT Squid Is A Chunky Piece of Steel.

          I got this knife as part of a trade over the summer and I thought I wasn’t going to like it very much but I started using it for work about two weeks ago and my initial impressions were proved way wrong. As of now I really like carrying this little folding knife. It’s got clean geometry, the finish is looks good, and it has proved useful for me. Plus, its a knife that won’t scare the “sheeple”, if you worry about that sort of thing.


          As usual, I shall start the review by talking about the blade and then move rearward. The CRKT Squid has a stubby 2.2″ (5.5cm) drop point blade that is hollow ground and covered in a black stonewashed finish. There is a model with a silver stonewashed finish if that is more your taste. My black stonewashed Squid has 8Cr13MoV blade steel but CRKT also makes a D2 and a Sandvik 12C27 version. If I where you, I would opt for the a non-8Cr13MoV blade because my Squid has been made dull by two weeks worth of hard use. I would prefer it stay sharper longer. And lastly, the knife deploys with a pair of thumb studs.

The CRKT Squid weighs in at 3.58oz (101.6g) and has an overall length of just 5.7″ (14.4cm). It is mostly made of steel so the weight shouldn’t be too much of a surprise.

          That brings us to the action. The Squid isn’t supremely smooth and it isn’t rough, either. It’s about what I would expect for a $20 folding knife. The Squid is a manual opener, which is what I prefer, but the thumb studs can be a little slow to get to when you need to open the knife. This is because of their position and the knife’s overall diminutive size. And when I say slow, I’m just talking about an extra second or two compared to deploying some of the most ideal of folding knives. Also, this knife has a frame lock which I can’t complain about at all. It is easy to actuate and ergonomic, in general.

          Given the size of my hands, I usually get a three-fingered grip on the handle. When I cut boxes, I tend to choke up on the handle and end up grabbing/pinching the blade between my thumb and index finger, so, I suppose, the knife does feel just “big enough” for me. But of course, it is a lot smaller than other knives out there and, as you can see, the handle is smooth and is made of steel with no liners. The grip factor isn’t awful, though. The outer geometry of the handle is able to help provide enough traction to where it won’t go flying out of your hand every tenth time you use it.

Despite an average price tag of $20 or less, this knife’s fit and finish is pretty good and the black stonewashed finish looks pretty sharp, if you ask me.

          The pocket clip is one of those deep carry ones, so it is barely noticeable when in the pocket. The black aluminum back spacer, which doubles as a lanyard loop, will pretty much be the only thing sticking out. Another good thing about the pocket clip is that it holds with the right amount of pressure and, since the handles are smooth, it will not shred your pockets. As someone who takes their knife out of their pocket many times throughout the work day, I must say this is an important feature. 

I am pretty glad that this knife will not tear up your pockets . Plus, the clip can handle thicker pocket material like the ones on my 5.11 Defender-Flex Slim Pants. It can also be clipped to sweatpants or shorts waste bands with no problems.

          If you are in the market for a discreet everyday carry knife, especially for the office, then consider this knife. It is modest and good looking and I have enjoyed carrying it since it takes it easy on pants pockets. I, for one, was surprised that I didn’t mind carry such a small knife.

          Thanks for reading this article. I put time into making sure that it was well constructed and informative. If you have any questions, criticisms, or comments go ahead and let me know in the comment section. I will try to answer any of your questions as soon as I can.


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