A Freedom Loving Voter’s Guide For The Elections

          You know who hinders all of your (moral) freedoms? Its the people in government. Particularly, the people in the legislative and executive branch at both the state and federal level. And, you know there are a lot of people in the government who are control freaks that hate self-reliance and individual liberty, right? When voting time comes around, you and I need to strip the government of these types of awful people.

          Voting. Its very important because if you apart of a political faction that isn’t politically savvy and doesn’t vote or attempt to communicate directly with your legislatures, then no one will try to represent your political views in government. And, because voting is so important and because I like freedom, I will provide you with some serious knowledge about the whole process.


Who do I get to vote for?

State Level:

Members of the House of Representatives

Senators

The Governor

The Lieutenant Governor

The Secretary of State

The Attorney General

The Treasurer

The Auditor

Federal Level:

Members of the House of Representatives

Senators

The President

 

When do I get to vote for these positions?

          All elections are held between November 2nd and November 8th and they are always on a Tuesday. This is for the general election which determines which candidate gets elected to the position in question. There are “semi-final” elections that come before the November elections. They are called primaries.

          Primaries, or primary elections, are elections that serve to narrow down the amount of the candidates from a party to just one person. Only one candidate from each political party can be featured in the general election in November. Primaries are held anywhere between March and August. The date varies based on what state you live in. Check out this link and enter “primary date” into the search box to see when the last primaries where held in each state. The first result should give you the latest primary date. When it comes to primaries, you may have to be previously associated with the party who’s primary you are voting in. So, when you go to register to vote, you will have to pick the political party who’s primary you wish to participate in.

 

Registering to vote.

          Along with being at least 18 years of age and being an actual citizen of this country, you must also be registered to vote. And, when you register you will be ask what party you are affiliated with such as Democrat, Republican, Libertarian, Green Party, Independent Party, etc… This will effect which primary you can participate in.

          In my state, Iowa, I can register whenever I go to the Department of Transportation office to update or renew my driver’s license. Depending on your state, there may be several and different voter registration practices you can pursue in order to get registered. Check out this link to see if you are already registered to vote in your current zip code. If you are not registered, then I would just call your local D.M.V. or D.O.T. office and ask them about getting registered.

          Please note: Time is of the essence! There may be a deadlines that you must beat in order to vote, but as usual this varies from state to state. Click on this link to see how much time you have left.

 

Additional Info on the Positions Up For Election

Federal Level:

The President – A new president is elected every four years and there is only one position up for grabs, but I’m sure you already knew that. Every eligible voter in America gets to vote in this election.

Senate – Each state has two senators. Their terms last 6 years and every two years, one third of U.S. senatorial seats will be up for election. All the eligible voters in the state in question are able to vote in the election for both senate seats. There are no districts for senators.

The House of Representatives – House seats are up for reelection every two years. The number of house members representing each state is based on the population of each state. California currently has 53 house members, while states like North Dakota and Alaska, have only one Representative that they can elect. For U.S. House elections, the state is divided into districts depending on the population of the given district.

State Level:

          The details on the positions up for election on a state level vary greatly from state-to-state so I will not go into much detail about them. These are the spots you will be voting on. If I am not mistaken, all of the positions listed below have a term length of either two or four years no matter which state you are in. Districts may be in place for the election of house representatives and senators.

Members of the House of Representatives

Senators

The Governor

The Lieutenant Governor

The Secretary of State

The Attorney General

The Treasurer

The Auditor

Click this link to see what your ballot will look like for the current election.←

 

Before you go, here are some tips to remember.

To see more information on who is currently in these positions and how long they have been there, try doing this…

  • To see who is currently in the legislature (house and senate) of your state, try entering this into your internet search engine → legis (Your State Here) .gov
    • After you get to the official state legislature website, look for a button that states “find your legislature”.
  • To see who is your governor and and Lt. Governor. Try entering this into your internet search engine  → (Your State Here).gov
    • This should get you to your state’s website. The Governor and Lt. Governor should be displayed on the home page.
  • Go to House.gov to check in on our current U.S. House of Representative.
  • Go to Senate.gov to see what’s happening with our current U.S. senators.